7 British English words that you need to know

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If you want to study or work in the UK

…no matter if you work, live, study in the UK or are only planning a holiday trip there. Those words are so common that not knowing them can make you feel a bit lost!

Cheers
‘Cheers, John, I appreciate it.!’  – you might have heard that one already. People say it when they toast someone but not only! Did you know that it’s very common to say ‘cheers’ instead of ‘thank you’? For British people, it’s a very natural, informal way of saying something more like ‘thanks’ to friends or other people in a little bit less formal situations. It can also be used to express good wishes to someone at the end of the conversation.

Lad
‘I’m going out with the lads tonight!’ – with who? Well, a lad is simply a guy or a man. Very often used to describe a group of people working together or sharing the same interests. It is a very informal word. On the other hand, women or girls can be called ‘lasses’ in certain regions of the UK.

Pint
‘Hey, Alex, will you join us for a pint after work? – sure, no problem, I will but what actually am I going to do there? Well, you’re simply going to drink beer (lots in most cases…). It’s a tradition to go out to the local pub for pints (glasses of beer) at least once a week on Friday with all your colleagues.

Quid/quids
‘Nothing to worry about, it only costs 10 quid!’ – would be great to know how much ‘a quid’ is, right? Well, it’s super simple, quid=pound. It’s just another word used to talk about the British currency!

Reckon
‘Do you reckon she’s gonna come?’ – this one is a bit more complicated as it has a few meanings. However, the most popular one being ‘to expect or to have an opinion about something’. Again, it sounds way more natural.

Cuppa
‘Would you like to come in for a cuppa?’ – oh yes, you’re not going to regret it. A cuppa is just short for ‘a cup of tea’ and we all know how the Brits are obsessed with tea. Oh, with milk. Tea without milk doesn’t make any sense.

Knackered
‘I’ve had to tidy up the whole house and I’m knackered!’ Who wouldn’t be? As you can guess, ‘knackered’ means really tired or exhausted.

Well, I reckon that’s it for now, lads. I’m gonna go have my cuppa now to relax as I’m completely knackered. Cheers for reading my post and let’s go out for a pint one day, shall we?